WV prison guard stops our client at gunpoint in Doddridge County, WV

Check out this new case. Police officer impersonation incident by a WV Division of Corrections CO / Parole officer. We met with investigators already, who were extremely concerned about what they saw here….

If you have any information, please contact us.

Episode 1 of the JOHN BRYAN PODCAST – impeachment, constitutional law, gun laws, self defense laws, and glucose meters are screwed up….

https://www.podbean.com/eu/pb-tqqbg-cb4067

Check out Episode 1 of the John Bryan PODCAST, where I pontificate on several topics, including impeachment evidence we’ve supposedly been hearing about, some search and seizure issues pertaining to the open carry of firearms, some self defense firearms issues, and a really crazy discovery that generic brand blood glucose meters, used by diabetics, are apparently way, way off……

 

The “Hurt” case against the West Virginia State Police and West Virginia DNR was filed, and is in the news….

5c1590d47fcdb.image_

Full Version of the Hurt Lawsuit.

Charleston Gazette-Mail article from this Sunday:

WV family’s call to police ends in excessive force lawsuit

A family from Camp Creek, in Mercer County, is alleging West Virginia State Police troopers and a Division of Natural Resources officer violated their civil rights and exercised excessive force on them after they called police in 2016 to report an armed, unstable neighbor — who later called in a fake hostage situation, stole a police cruiser from a trooper and set it ablaze — according to a federal lawsuit filed last month in the Southern District of West Virginia.

“It was just like boom, out of nowhere all of a sudden my yard was filled with them, all screaming and hollering at [Lilly],” Ronnie Hurt said…..

Wills, who was on the phone with 911 during the entire incident, heard officers yelling at her father to step off the porch with his hands up. Due to health issues and physical disabilities, she knew he needed help climbing the porch stairs, so she went outside to assist.

Within seconds of Willis stepping outside, Trooper John R. Tupper and DNR officer Marshall Richards grabbed her and her father by the arms, yanking them “violently and forcefully” face-first off the porch and onto the ground, the suit reads.

“They didn’t tell me anything, nothing at all,” Wills said. “Not to put my hands up, not to hang up the phone. I didn’t even have a chance before I was on the ground.”

One officer grabbed Wills’ phone, hung up on 911 and threw it on the ground before stepping on it with his boot, she said.

 

Another civil rights case settled….

This was actually a few weeks back and was posted on our Facebook.  For posterity, I’ll post here as well….

image1.jpg

This is my client, Robert McPherson. Today we reached a settlement in our lawsuit against the City of Hinton, WV and former police chief, Derek Snavely.

This case was on the front page of the Charleston Gazette-Mail a month or so back, which published a full copy of the federal lawsuit:

https://www.wvgazettemail.com/…/article_13d20637-f1d0-5c6e-…

“John Bryan, a Union-based attorney representing Robert McPherson, a man who filed a lawsuit in the Southern District of West Virginia against Snavely and the city of Hinton alleging excessive force by Snavely, said he wasn’t surprised to hear about the former police chief’s troubles of three weeks ago. Bryan said he had heard several people voicing concern about Snavely for a while.

“This is kind of a problem West Virginia has — if someone leaves a position, even if they should [leave] for a good reason, it’s cheaper to hire them on somewhere else instead of hiring someone who doesn’t have that certification,” Bryan said. “Unless that certification is gone, they are probably going to be picked up somewhere else.”

In his lawsuit, McPherson alleges that, in January 2016, Snavely punched him in the face — unprovoked — before proceeding to “violently beat” him outside a Kroger store.”

More about the lawsuit, and Snavely, here, on my blog:

https://wvcriminaldefenseattorney.wordpress.com/…/mcpherso…/

The terms provide for an award of $75,000.00 to Mr. McPherson. It’s always easier to make a client happy when you get to give him money, instead of the other way around.
😄 I’m glad it all worked out in the end.

Update: Charleston Gazette-Mail article: https://www.wvgazettemail.com/…/article_304c067d-079f-5ae8-…

McPherson Case makes front page news this morning

This morning, investigative reporter Catie Coyne had a great article on the front page of the Charleston Gazette-Mail about the McPherson case, and the firing of Hinton police chief, Derek Snavely.

image1

I’ve been doing this for awhile.  Usually after the news dies down, a fired police officer will quietly appear somewhere else – usually a small municipality or county somewhere. I’ve seen it happen again and again.  When the reporter called me about the case, I shared my frustration with her.

The Hinton police chief — who is the target of a federal lawsuit filed in December alleging that he used excessive force on a Summers County man by beating him and hitting him three times with a stun gun without provocation — was terminated this week based on his “job performance,” according to Hinton City Councilman Larry Meadow….

John Bryan, a Union-based attorney representing Robert McPherson, a man who filed a lawsuit in the Southern District of West Virginia against Snavely and the city of Hinton alleging excessive force by Snavely, said he wasn’t surprised to hear about the former police chief’s troubles of three weeks ago. Bryan said he had heard several people voicing concern about Snavely for a while.

“This is kind of a problem West Virginia has — if someone leaves a position, even if they should [leave] for a good reason, it’s cheaper to hire them on somewhere else instead of hiring someone who doesn’t have that certification,” Bryan said. “Unless that certification is gone, they are probably going to be picked up somewhere else.”

McPherson Case defendant, Snavely, fired as police chief of Hinton

The City of Hinton has now fired its police chief, Derek Snavely.  Snavely is the primary defendant in the McPherson v. Snavely, et al. excessive force lawsuit currently pending in the federal district court for the Southern District of West Virginia.

snavely_1534358943231_51988764_ver1.0_640_360

From the Register-Herald newspaper this morning:

HINTON – Mayor Joe Blankenship announced Tuesday that Hinton Police Chief Derek Snavely has been terminated.

An emotional Blankenship made the announcement during a city council meeting in Hinton, not long after reports surfaced that Snavely had been placed on leave following a domestic dispute.

During his tearful speech, Blankenship said that Snavely was promoted to police chief in 2009 without his recommendation, due to the fact that he was dating his daughter, Bethany. Blankenship also stated that he has always recused himself from meetings concerning raises for Snavely.

“City code states that the office of police chief is at the will and pleasure of the mayor in every municipality, therefore I feel I cannot stand aside any longer concerning this situation,” Blankenship stated. “As Bethany’s father and best friend, I feel that I’m aware of everything.”

At the time the City of Hinton hired Mr. Snavely, Mr. Snavely was in the news for having been effectively fired by the West Virginia State Police for misconduct.  This information was also known at the time the City of Hinton promoted him to police chief. See Trooper Accused of Rape Resigns, Charleston Gazette-Mail, http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20081211/ARTICLE/312119998.  He was also in the news for allegedly falsifying police records to cover up his misconduct. See Prosecutor Not Told Ex-Trooper Falsified Log, Charleston Gazette-Mail, http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20081211/ARTICLE/312119998. 

The State Police even took the unprecedented step of making a public statement about Snavely.  It was reported in the Herald-Dispatch newspaper, that the newly-appointed West Virginia State Police spokesperson said, of Snavely, “We can’t have things like this,” waving a newspaper with an article about Snavely’s alleged misconduct, stating that, “it reflects poorly on me and [the superintendent] . . . it kills me.”  He noted that it was important for the state police to do “everything we an to acknowledge and address these incidents, and then we need to move forward.” See W. Va. State Police Col. Focusing on Standards, The Herald-Dispatch, http://www.herald-dispatch.com/news/recent_news/w-va-state-police-col-focusing-on-standards/article_2d9b2963-a067-59b1-93d1-ac4e8004ccfe.html.  

This was all known (1) before he was hired by the City of Hinton; and (2) before he was promoted to police chief.  I’m sure the fact that he was dating (and now married to) the mayor’s daughter had nothing to do with it.  This is not the first time a police officer resigned due to misconduct and then was hired by some small town in West Virginia.  That’s been a recurring problem across the state.

Police Chief we sued in federal court is the subject of a scathing TV news report today.

Awhile back, we filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against the City of Hinton and its police chief, Derek Snavely.  Mr. Snavely was no stranger to the media, even then. Here is the Complaint:

McPherson v. Snavely, et al.

Well, he is back in the news this morning.  Check out this TV news clip from WVNS.

WVNS – Hinton police chief on leave; forced to turn in service weapon, badge and police cruiser