Federal Lawsuit Filed in the Creepy Cops Caught on Video Case

The lawsuit was filed today on behalf of Dustin Elswick, against Putnam County, West Virginia, along with four police officers involved in the infamous “Special Enforcement Unit.” These are the cops who were caught on hidden camera searching the inside of Dustin’s home. Although they cut the wire on an outside surveillance camera, they were apparently unaware of the cameras inside the home.

This is a federal “Section 1983” lawsuit alleging the violation of federal constitutional rights; namely, the Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable search and seizure. A warrantless search of your home is automatically unconstitutional in the absence of one of two exceptions: consent, or exigent circumstances (emergency), neither of which apply here. Two prior federal lawsuits have already been filed against the SEU thus far for similar allegations in the Johnson case, as well as the Dillon case. The remedy is an award of money damages, along with reasonable attorney fees and expenses.

There was an internal investigation, as the news reported, but we never received information about the outcome. That sheriff has since been replaced.

Here’s the Complaint:

Here’s the original video:

Here’s the update video:

“Lackluster” Youtube Channel Gets a Fraudulent Copyright Strike for Dashcam Footage and Now We Sue

You may have seen the dashcam footage of the Arkansas State Police trooper flipping the pregnant woman’s car over a traffic stop. The main video which was making the viral rounds was on the Lackluster channel. Well, a TV news station issued a takedown notice to Youtube, alleging ownership of the footage. The problem is, however, that Lackluster obtained it directly from the Arkansas State Police. As a result, his video was pulled and kept down for about 4 days. This killed the virility of the video, deprived the channel of valuable revenue, and was totally unfounded. Here’s the info….